View Steven Baster's check-ins on GetGlue
marvelandspiderman:

It’s 100% legit and SUPER scary

~Peter

marvelandspiderman:

It’s 100% legit and SUPER scary

~Peter

ageofsuperheroes:

These two shots were arguably the funniest parts of The Avengers.

juvenilecinephile:

Terrence Malick in Badlands

juvenilecinephile:

Terrence Malick in Badlands

World’s Greatest Dad

World’s Greatest Dad

"Robin Williams was loved at Nintendo. Our hearts go out to his entire family, and especially to Zelda Williams who we’ve worked with multiple times. We appreciate the outpouring of support from the gaming community, and hear the request of fans to honor him in a future game. We will not be discussing what might be possible for future games during this difficult time, but we will hold our memories of Robin close." -Nintendo Petition Nintendo of America to name a NPC in the new Legend of Zelda game for Wii U after Robin Williams105,932 supporters so far, can we get to 150,000? (via nintendocafe)
rocketeam:

I truly love the excellent portrayal of melancholy in Edward Hopper’s paintings.

rocketeam:

I truly love the excellent portrayal of melancholy in Edward Hopper’s paintings.

artistandframer:

This is awesome and I really want to see this movie. Director, Gustav Deutsch’s film Shirley - Visions of Reality brings to life the paintings of Edward Hopper. (Similar to this Van Gogh project) The set designs, which faithfully recreate a number of Hopper’s paintings are by Hanna Schimek. My only qualm with the sets, are that I wish that they weren’t so literal with the painted backdrops in the real scenes. But aside from that, it’s really incredible to see the actors in these scenes. Hopper already had such a cinematic sense in his paintings, that this movie seems like an obvious choice and one wonders why no one ever did it before. 

Directors statement:
As the starting point for this film, which has at its heart the staging of reality and the dialogue of painting and film, I selected Edward Hopper’s picturesque oeuvre, which on the one hand was influenced by film noir – in his choice of lighting, subject and framing as seen in paintings such as Night Windows (1938), Office at Night (1940), Room in New York (1932) and his direct references to cinema such as in New York Movie (1939) and Intermission (1963) – and on the other hand influenced filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchcock, Jim Jarmusch, Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders.